An Absolutely Remarkable Thing: A Book Review

An Absolutely Remarkable Thing by Hank Green is the first book written by popular YA author John Green’s brother. His writing style is totally different. A highly believable sci-fi book with characters that are sometimes hard to love and themes that really make you question yourself and society, I think that this book was an excellent debut for Hank Green.

The story is narrated (mostly) by the main character April May. A bisexual, artsy millennial who stumbles upon a giant robotic-looking statue outside in New York City one night. She calls one of her best friends, Andy, to come and see it, names it Carl, and they record a video for his YouTube channel, becoming instantly famous. It turns out that the Carl in New York isn’t the only one. They have popped up in cities all over the world and no one knows how they got there or who put them there. April May and her friends discover that the Carls are not just an art piece but possibly an alien species. Two schools of thought break out in society: one is that the Carls are there to bring humanity together, and the other is that they are out to destroy us. Between telephone conferences with the President, TV interviews, and writing a book about her experience with Carl, April May struggles with how to keep ahead of the crowd so she can keep her fame and her own self-importance with regards to the Carls (being the first to make contact with an alien species and all). Her and her friends work together to solve the many puzzles the Carls have left for the human race in order to discover what their purpose  and reason for coming to Earth is.

The book deals with some pretty big themes and makes some serious social commentaries about today’s youth and even government. Some of the themes include love in a modern society and friendship. One of the themes is the use of social media and fame in modern society. Another theme is the effects and perils of fanaticism. It also deals with the mores of sexuality in society and how and why Millennials deal with personal relationships. The book also makes commentaries on how fame can change people and on having a personal identity, while also having a strong message about cooperation among people in order to unite humanity.

While the story is utterly ridiculous, it is almost believable because of all of the thematic references which are so personal to so many young people in society right now. April May’s story is either familiar to you, or you know of someone that may be going through something similar, or thinks similarly to her. Her character is not always easy to love. In fact, through many parts of the book, I found myself really disliking her. However, I think she is an excellent character. She has many depths and is very believable.

It is definitely an intelligent book, however, it was not a difficult read. The story flows and the voice keeps it from being stuffy. I have not read a lot of sci-fi, but this book was pretty fantastic. I truly enjoyed reading it and it also made me think. It does end a bit unexpectedly, but luckily it is the first book in a series and will be continued (although Goodreads has not listed a title yet or a release date, so it seems we might be waiting a while to see how the story continues).

 

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